Edward Hopper’s Views of Isolation

Edward Hopper’s New York at the Whitney is a near-encyclopedic evaluation of the artist’s myriad types and sundry interests as they pertain to his extensive-expression house and recurrent subject matter, Manhattan. The exhibition also will make the topic of isolation pellucid by way of structural studies of the city natural environment and portraits of Hopper’s longtime muse, fellow artist and wife, Josephine Hopper (1883–1968).

The Whitney sales opportunities the exhibition with Hopper’s early scholar paintings and research from the 1910s, executed as he commuted to Manhattan by ferry to show up at the New York University of Artwork and Style. The city and its austere, industrious ornamentation is previously a recurrent motif for the youthful Hopper, who toys with extraordinary mild outcomes and draws from day to day existence. Even in these early paintings, adumbral bridges and tunnels threaten to fold into their environment.

Autumnal paintings like “November, Washington Square” (c. 1932/1959) are curiously barren. They provide as a time capsule for now-lapsed architectural marvels like the Judson Memorial Church sanctuary making, but a lot more importantly they provide a watch into Hopper’s stark, alienated province. Considerably influenced by French Impressionists like Degas, who so profoundly moved his teacher, Robert Henri (1865–1929), Hopper was intrigued in a variety of realism. But his realism and its coeval compositions cannot be deracinated from the chilly structures that populate them.

Rather than turning to the rapid experience of putatively untouched wilderness as the American Transcendentalists whom he avidly browse, Hopper’s New York paintings evince an interest in constructed character. Paintings like “House at Dusk” (1935) exhibit Hopper twisting the cityscape into a forbidding playground. “The City” (1927), one particular of the lots of “rooftop paintings” that Hopper produced, sports an elevated perspective where by brick-faced row properties of variegated designs are stretched into a horizontal simple. Dotted nameless park-goers amble along the sidewalk. Neither are they close-by nor are they participating with a single another—each a private, impenetrable daily life.

Edward Hopper, “Night Shadows” (1921), etching, 12 × 15 15/16 inches (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York Josephine N. Hopper Bequest 70.1047. © 2022 Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper/Licensed by Artists Legal rights Modern society (ARS), New York)

The “nocturne” etchings on display—some of the most subtle but penetrating performs in the exhibition—demonstrate Hopper’s compositional dexterity as he experimented with monochromatic light and shadow. The city facades merge with wilted tree leaves and desiccated croaking twigs. Early Hopper parts from the 1920s, these as “Night in the Park” (1921), capture the sensibility of alienation that, right now, is arguably heightened by know-how and urban progress. The darkness of adumbrated park benches, cloaked by the shadows of looming branchlets, envelop a lone determine looking at the newspaper. Mother nature, human-produced buildings, and the figures who populate them are interwoven into a chilled prevalent breath.

Glancing about any group of early morning or afternoon educate passengers, the urbanites of today’s New York are privy to a scattering of non-public worlds. Glowing mobile phones direct our interest, shaping and conducting our bodies which, no subject their bodily proximity to just one another, are resolutely autonomous. These types of concentrated autonomy might only be marginally detectable in Hopper’s noir-bedaubed “Nighthawks” (1942). Hopper even arguably gestures away from it his sympathetic experiments of Josephine like “Morning Sun” (1952). But even here, in the half-sipped espresso mugs, is a brisk quietude. When taken together with his oeuvre of New York paintings, Hopper’s do the job has considerably less to do with the psychological realities of his issue and more to do with a keenly modern day stripe of aloofness. 

Edward Hopper, “Manhattan Bridge” (1925–26), watercolor and graphite pencil on paper, 13 15/16 × 19 15/16 inches (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York Josephine N. Hopper Bequest 70.1098 © 2022 Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper/Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York)
Edward Hopper, “City Roofs” (1932), oil on canvas, 35 11/16 × 28 11/16 inches (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York bequest of Carol Franc Buck 2022.98. © 2022 Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper/Accredited by Artists Legal rights Culture (ARS), New York)
Edward Hopper, “The Sheridan Theatre” (1937), oil on canvas, 17 × 25 inches (Newark Museum of Art, NJ Felix Fuld Bequest Fund. © 2022 Heirs of Josephine N.
Hopper/Certified by Artists Rights Culture (ARS), New York. Impression courtesy Art Useful resource)
Edward Hopper, “The Sheridan Theatre” (1937), oil on canvas, 17 × 25 inches (Newark Museum of Artwork, NJ Felix Fuld Bequest Fund. © 2022 Heirs of Josephine N.
Hopper/Licensed by Artists Legal rights Society (ARS), New York. Graphic courtesy Art Resource)

Edward Hopper’s New York continues at the Whitney Museum of American Artwork (99 Gansevoort Street, Manhattan) via March 5. The exhibition was curated by Kim Conaty and Melinda Lang.